Tuesday, 1 April 2014

The Post About a Post Post

Gardeners like to experiment in their gardens, so if a gardener stumbles into the blogosphere, it stands to reason that before long the blogging gardener will start to experiment there too. 


My attempt at a blogging gardener's experiment is to try guest blogging and I have just had a guest post published at the Thompson & Morgan blog about one of my favourite high value, low cost plants. http://blog.thompson-morgan.com/your-stories/high-value-low-cost-plants-cerinthe-major-purpurascens/

I wasn't paid to do it, or even offered a packet of seeds. I just wanted to tell people about this amazing plant. I know it's a cheek, but I would be ever so grateful if you would be kind enough to click on the link and make a comment so I don't look completely like Sarah-No-Mates. Thank you! I will be back here tomorrow celebrating the best thing about spring.

12 comments:

  1. Hi Sarah, have left a comment on the T&M site. Well done for a lovely article, I will give that plant a go as I love a garden full of wildlife, and have to hear bees buzzing around me when outside.

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    1. Thank you! It really is a plant worth growing - I'm so glad you'll give it a go. Thank you so much for taking the trouble to comment there and here - I really appreciate it!

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  2. I sow Cerinthe every year. I grow seed to seed. My brother gave me some seeds many years ago and that started the trend......fab bee plant.

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    1. It is a fab bee plant. Your story is proof of the great value of this plant - and it's even cheaper if you have a gardening brother.

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  3. Loved your article! I'm going to order some seeds today!

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    1. Thank you! I wish you many happy years with Cerinthe major!

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  4. Great post, I tried to make a comment but it seems that doing so from my phone doesn't bring up the button I need to post the message.
    I'll pop back when I'm on the lap top to do it :)

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    1. Thank you! And thank you for trying, Angie.

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  5. Lovely article Sarah. I'm also going to try Phacelia this year which the bees are supposed to love.

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    1. Thank you. Bees do love Phacelia - I look forward to reading about how you get along with it.

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  6. Sounds like you might be responsible for a big rise in the sales of cerinthe seeds... hope you're working on commission! It's a great post.

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    1. Thank you! No commission - not even a bean. I just wanted to share my passion for this plant with as many people as possible!

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